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Alumni News

Alfred Kelly Jr. ’76 Profiled in The Journal News

Alumnus Alfred Kelly Jr. ’76 was recently featured in an article in The Journal News for his role as the CEO of the NY/NJ Super Bowl Host Committee.

Iona Prep alumnus Alfred Kelly Jr. ’76 was featured in an article in The Journal News on January 31, 2013 for his role as the CEO of the NY/NJ Super Bowl Host Committee. Alfred is in charge of implementing a game plan to showcase the metropolitan region which is now less than a year away.
 
One of the main concerns about Super Bowl XLVIII, which will be played at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, NJ, home of the Giants and Jets, is the weather.
 
“Even though lots of big events have taken place in this region, the Super Bowl is a really big deal,” Alfred said while in New Orleans for the recent Super Bowl. “They will have played this championship game for the last five decades without ever coming to the biggest stage in the world, so it’s about time.”
 
The past four Super Bowls have generated in excess of 150 million television viewers, and the event plays on the flat screen like a weeklong advertisement, touting business and tourism in the host city or region. According to an estimate by the NY/NJ Super Bowl Host Committee, the NFL’s biggest game will have a $550 million impact on the regional economy.
 
So this is an important gig for Alfred, who was president of American Express until he retired in 2009. He was head of information systems at the White House from 1985 to 1987, and prior to that worked for PepsiCo. He doesn’t have much of a sports background, though he did earn all-county status in track at Iona Prep. Alfred is an Iona College graduate as well.
 
“I play golf and tennis and work out, all with great mediocrity,” said the Harrison resident.
 
Though the NFL picks the venues needed to host a weeklong slate of pregame events and has the final say in most decisions, it requires an independent, not-for-profit host company to organize the masses involved with the effort.
 
“We’re responsible for raising the money to put the game on,” Alfred said. “We’re responsible for marketing events leading up to the Super Bowl. We’re responsible for building community involvement and spirit. We’re going to need 15,000 volunteers, the most I know of for any event in the region.”